Protecting
Kasanka National Park
Zambia

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Kasanka National Park
Home of the greatest mammal migration on Earth

Kasanka National Park is a sanctuary for a wealth of African wildlife on the southwestern edge of the Lake Bangweulu basin and is one of Zambia’s smallest national parks. It is dominated by Miombo woodland but has pockets of rare habitat such as papyrus swamp, which is home to the world’s densest population of the rare Sitatunga antelope.

Kasanka National Park Bat Migration_Credit to Kieran Dodds Flickr
Over 10 million Straw-coloured Fruit Bats descend on Kasanka National Park (Photo: Kieran Dodds Flickr)

The true mammal spectacle of Kasanka is the migration of over 10 million Straw-coloured Fruit Bats, which descend into a few hectares of Mushitu Swamp Forest. The bats arrive with the first rains of the wet season and gorge themselves on the berries of the forest. As with any rich gathering of prey species, the migration attracts a gathering of predators and scavengers such as Leopard, Water Monitors, Crocodiles, Martial Eagles, Pythons, Fish Eagles, Lesser-spotted and African Hawk-Eagles, kites, vultures and hobby falcons.

The true mammal spectacle of Kasanka is the migration of over 10 million Straw-coloured Fruit Bats, which descend into a few hectares of Mushitu Swamp Forest. The bats arrive with the first rains of the wet season and gorge themselves on the berries of the forest. As with any rich gathering of prey species, the migration attracts a gathering of predators and scavengers such as Leopard, Water Monitors, Crocodiles, Martial Eagles, Pythons, Fish Eagles, Lesser-spotted and African Hawk-Eagles, kites, vultures and hobby falcons.

Kasanka National Park Bat Migration_Credit to Kieran Dodds Flickr
Over 10 million Straw-coloured Fruit Bats descend on Kasanka National Park (Photo: Kieran Dodds Flickr)

Threats:
bushmeat hunting & deforestation

Kasanka National Park_Keepers of the Wild_Elephant Guardians_Credit to World Land Trust
Snared by Ivory Poachers - Elephant Rescue November 2016 (Photo: World Land Trust)

Kasanka’s wildlife is under threat from poachers, and World Land Trust’s (WLT) existing commitment is to work with the Kasanka Trust through the Keepers of the Wild programme, funding two rangers who patrol the park, apprehend poachers and take students from local schools and tourists on tours around the park.

Rangers were involved in an elephant rescue operation which took place in November 2016, darting and treating the young bull elephant with snares around his back legs.

Kasanka’s wildlife is under threat from poachers, and World Land Trust’s (WLT) existing commitment is to work with the Kasanka Trust through the Keepers of the Wild programme, funding two rangers who patrol the park, apprehend poachers and take students from local schools and tourists on tours around the park.

Rangers were involved in an elephant rescue operation which took place in November 2016, darting and treating the young bull elephant with snares around his back legs.

Kasanka National Park_Keepers of the Wild_Elephant Guardians_Credit to World Land Trust
Snared by Ivory Poachers - Elephant Rescue November 2016 (Photo: World Land Trust)

Where is
Kasanka National Park?

Our Current 'Buy-An-Acre' Project:
Mulaushi Reserve

The Mulaushi Reserve lies within the Kasanka National Park Buffer Zone, its eastern boundary directly bordering the park. The reserve is rich in wildlife, including Roan and Sable Antelope, Hartebeest, Warthog, Bushpig, Common Duiker and Yellow Baboon.

Tree Hugger Traveldriven through our client Eco Rewards programme, will be donating to World Land Trust Mulaushi Reserve ‘Buy-an-Arce’ land protection programme. 

World Land Trust - Logo - Tree Hugger Travel Home

Kasanka National Park supports over 100 mammal and 500 bird species, from African Elephant to Wattled Crane. In 2013, the Kasanka Trust successfully reintroduced zebra and buffalo to the region.
By adding Mulaushi Reserve to the areas under protection, Tree Hugger Travel and our clients support for this World Land Trust project ensures a safe haven for African wildlife.
Mulaushi Reserve will increase the area protected from human encroachment and provide safer habitats and areas of movement for threatened species such as African Elephant, Sitatunga, Yellow-backed Duiker and Blue Monkey.

Booking Tours
Saves Rainforest

Planning To Travel?

Tree Hugger Travel is an ethical travel agency where booking tours literally means saving endangered wildlife and habitats.

Tree Hugger Travel donate up to ⅓ of your tour bookings to World Land Trust.

Collect Eco-Reward Points every time you book tours and experiences through Tree Hugger Travel. Eco-Rewards fund the purchase of biologically important threatened areas of rainforest worldwide.
Collect Eco-Reward Points every time you book tours and experiences through Tree Hugger Travel. Eco-Rewards fund the purchase of biologically important threatened areas of rainforest worldwide.

Booking Tours Saves Rainforest

Planning To Travel?
Tree Hugger Travel is an ethical travel agency where booking tours literally means saving endangered wildlife and habitats.
Tree Hugger Travel donate up to ⅓ of your tour bookings to World Land Trust.

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